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Tag: patriarchy

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Mature Heroines in Romance Literature

THE HOUSE ON BLACK LAKE HAS BEEN ADAPTED TO SCREENPLAY. GO TO HOME PAGE TO VIEW PROVOCATIVE CINEMATIC TRAILER

During my travels in promoting The House on Black Lake I have spoken to many women frustrated that most romance novel authors cut off heroine age at around 36, an age when most women have only begun to fully mature into their innate beauty and strength. Yet a good number of these authors are well into their 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, and even older.

When I set out to write The House on Black Lake I could not imagine featuring a woman who was not fully mature in my book. All of the women featured in my novel are over forty, and there is an extremely seductive character well into her sixties. In the course of the trilogy that constitutes the entirety of the story of heroine, Alexandra Brighton’s journey, she and the women in her sphere will age with incredible beauty, dignity, strength, and romantic passion.

I do not promote a social structure that demeans women in their prime because they pursue what nature deems their best course, including mating with a young, healthy male. I say no, and so does my heroine.  Alexandra is desired by all of the conflicted males in the tale, and torn between the seductiveness of the younger male and the depth of her intellectual , sexual, and emotional equal, Ramey Sandeley. The elder patriarchal elite, represented by Roger Sandeley, find her both a treasure and threat, as she carries the ultimate power.

 We learn in the prelude to Alexandra’s story that she was a beautiful young woman taught to accept the role society had laid out for her. When she suffers a disfiguring affliction after child birth, she makes a vow at St. Andre’s Shrine, “Truth for Beauty” – a promise to follow her divine destiny in return of an unblemished face. As she attempts to follow her chosen path she finds herself demeaned and diminished by society. And when she leaves her powerful, wealthy, controlling husband, the court strips her of her children and financial security. Ultimately, she is left broke and alone. The journey into the underground of Black Lake is her only hope of salvation.

 The greatest fear of most mature men is abandonment and failure, and that is why mature women are stripped of their power when they choose to compete with, leave an older man, or cast eyes at younger men.  What is more inconsionable is that women strip themselves of their own and other women’s power by buying into stereotypes and myths, competing with other women, and accepting that beauty and money alone have value. And yet, it is the patriarchal elite who have the most to lose, for they squelch their only hope of a soulmate to nurture them at home and unite to govern the world with humanity and grace.

The House on Black Lake is a woman’s journey through the underground of society, subsequent transformation, and empowerment. The men and women who do not live by society’s rules, the gypsies, witches, and mystics, are Alexandra’s tutors in redefining what constitutes power and beauty.

Strange female creatures are being created in operating rooms all over the world as women accept a twisted notion of what allures, while the guile and determination that defines charm is further buried. Many mature women give up altogether  and live through their daughters. The opposite should be the norm, as young girls must learn from the vibrant females of our world, and not the opposite. They shall earn their place when they have passed through the trials of financial struggle, work, motherhood, sorrow, loss, and as well as travel, adventure, and passionate love.

 I yearn for the guidance of the goddesses of the past, and strive to become one worthy of following. I say it’s time for revolution, a revolution of mature heroines storming into modern society, a new breed to lead the younger generations.

Writers need to know what their followers desires. Contact them on their websites if you seek to learn more about powerful females and their adventures.

Scene from trailer/novel where sexy young artist Andre Labat (Tosh Yanez) seduces heroine, Alexandra Brighton, (Anastasia Blackwell)  a mother of two and well into 40's. He is one of three successful and powerful men who vie for her attention.

Another character, Luna Sandeley, is in her 60's with a wealthy husband, a younger lover, and the adoration of many others

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Sarah Palin's Parlor

One can only imagine the entrance to Sarah Palin's Parlor. Likely it is homey, filled with the smell of freshly cook jam, and the stuffed and mounted relics of her gamesmanship - perhaps like the picture featured below.

The photograph was taken in the parlor of the Chateau Tivoli in San Francisco while shooting film trailer for scene in “The House on Black Lake”.  In novel protagonist Alexandra Brighton is ushered into the stately summer home of Ruth and Ramey Sandeley and is aghast to see the lineup of exotic animal head trophies and artifacts decorating the elegant room. Ruth tells Alexandra that her husband believes when you look into a powerful animal’s eyes and take its life you are bound forever. Of course, this is not a good omen for Alexandra.

 Most hunters keep a souvenir of victims when they kill for sport, and not for survival. Yet, rarely do women lust for blood. “A woman gives life, and God, the father, takes it”, Ramey informs Alexandra. In the course of her journey she is betrayed by women with a thirst for second hand power and ultimately led into a patriarchal trap. Sarah Palin's hunting partner is not her mother, sister, or girl friend - it is her father. In her videotaped journey she finds a pioneer soul sister squatting in the depths of the Antarctic, who sews her own  flesh wounds and professes to love blood and guts in the manner in which other woman covet jewels. She is not a not bold feminist in a frontier land, but rather a conservative leader in a modern world. She does not shoot for sustenance, but rather for the glory of the kill, and the camera that records the killings seeps a taste of the barbaric into mainstream experience. A female who gives and takes life for sport is clearly an anomaly, in all of nature. Dominance cannot succeed without its hand maidens, and there are rewards for those who are willing to play the game. What the protagonist in the story does not realize is that she is the trophy. In the course mankind's recorded history the display of a sacrificed victim has always been a symbol of power and domination.

 Perhaps it is time for Sarah to clean her parlor of the relics of domination and fill it with trophies of empowerment. When she puts down the rifle and embraces mother earth, all creatures will feel more secure. A female role model that embodies the unique powers of the feminine, while igniting the loftier attributes of the male, carries the hope of a remarkable new world order.